Healthy Trends: Motor Vehicle Safety

National Data

Healthy People 2010 identifies national health objectives for the year 2010.

Data 2010 finds the latest data for each objective. Search Data 2010 by objective number, e.g., 15-04, where the first number refers to one of 28 chapters or “focus areas” and the second refers to the objective number within the focus area.

Examples of traffic safety data from these sources:

Measure Population Percent Obj#
Recent Data† (2001) Goal for 2010‡
Motor Vehicle Deaths and Injuries:
Motor vehicle crash deaths per 100,000 population All 14.9 9.2 15-15a
American Indian or Alaskan Native 25.1
Males 20.9
Less than high school education 25.6
Nonfatal motor vehicle crash injuries per 100,000 population All 1,065 933 15-17
Alcohol-related motor vehicle crash deaths per 100,000 population All 4 26-01a
American Indian or Alaskan Native
Aged 15-24 years
Males
Alcohol-related motor vehicle crash injuries per 100,000 population All 65 26-01b
Pedestrian Deaths and Injuries:
Pedestrian deaths on public roads per 100,000 population All 1.7 1 15-16
Males 2.4
Age 70 or over 2.7
Nonfatal pedestrian injuries on public roads per 100,000 population All 28 19 15-18
Aged 5-9 Years 57
State and Local Efforts:
Proportion of the population that uses safety belts All 75%
(2002)
92% 15-19
Number jurisdictions with a graduated driver licensing model law 50 states and the District of Columbia NA 50 states and D.C. 15-22
Number jurisdictions with license revocation laws for intoxicated drivers 50 states and the District of Columbia NA 50 states and D.C. 26-24

†Recent data taken from Data 2010.
‡2010 goals taken from Healthy People 2010.

 

State Data

Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) will create customized state or national maps and reports based on any of dozens of variables. It is administered by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s National Center for Statistics and Analysis.

Also see the NHTSA data page for prepared data reports.

Example of FARS data:

On New Year’s Day, 2002, there were 3 fatal motor vehicle crashes in Kentucky.

CDC’s WISQARS (Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System) provides state- and national-level data related to fatal and nonfatal motor vehicle injuries.

Example of WISQARS Data:

In 2001, there were 108,453 years of potential life lost (YPLL) before age 65 due to motor vehicle injuries in Texas, with 7,532 YPLL before age 65 among motorcyclists alone.

CDC’s Injury Maps allow users to create county-, state-, or national-level maps showing the geographic distribution of motor vehicle injury mortalities and eight other leading causes of injury mortality.

Example of data from an Illinois injury map:

During the period 1989-1998, there were an average of 1,623 motor vehicle deaths each year in Illinois, or an average of 13.8/100,000 population. Only 4 Illinois counties experienced motor vehicle fatality rates at or above the 75th national percentile for the period.